New York's most famous museums and expositions. Descriptions and tours of the best Museums in New York City.    
 
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NEW YORK CITY MUSEUMS

  • New York City Museums. In an educational sense our great public Museums of New York are doing very important work. The Trustees of an institution like the Metropolitan Museum of Art have long ago outgrown the idea that it was simply a place in which to display rare paintings and priceless works of art. The idea now is to encourage the interest in these collections for their utility as well as their beauty and to seek to benefit industry and the artisan.
  • The New York Historical Society. On the block bounded by 76th and 77th Streets, Central Park West, just around the corner from the Museum of Natural History, stands the building of one of our oldest institutions—the Historical Society, founded by John Pintard in 1804.
  • American Museum of Natural History The AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, in Manhattan Square, at Seventy-seventh street, may be visited as a part of the Park tour. The Museum is open from 10 A. M. to ; 1 P. M. on week days, and from 1 to 5 P. M. on Sunday.
  • Metropolitan Museum of Art The metropolitan museum of art is a private corporation, founded in 1870 by a number of public-spirited citizens, and managed by a board of trustees. The Museum building was provided by the city. The Metropolitan is the largest and richest art museum in America; it is a vast storehouse of treasures in the several departments of the fine arts.

 

  • The 156 Street Museums and Societies. Leaving the Subway, walk down 156 street and you will see an attractive group of buildings occupying an entire block. All are open free, daily. The Hispanic Museum, the Numismatic Society and the American Geographical Society.

 

  • THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM.
  • The Brooklyn Museum The Brooklyn Museum is situated at Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue, near the main entrance to Prospect Park, and may be reached from New York by subway. The collections are provided by the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences.
  • American paintings and artists. Entering the Brooklyn Museum take the elevator at the end of the corridor to the third floor, which is entirely devoted to art. On the walls of the landing are large photographs of Gothic cathedrals, of special interest are the collection of american paintings from american artists.
  • Egyptian Collection. Pottery, glass and porcelain. The Egyptian and prehistoric collection is in the wall case. The Tiffany glass is a representative exhibit. Beside this is Venetian glass of the XVIth, XVIIth, and XVIIIth centuries. There follow cases of pottery, and a collection of English glass. The Woodward collection of Greco-Roman glass is in gallery 8. Gallery 9 is filled with textiles and the wall cases with European porcelain.
  • European Gallery and Renaissance Sculptures. The Woodward collection of jade is installed in the room opening out of the Tissot gallery. It includes a comprehensive selection of various classes of objects including chinese jade, European paintings and Renaissance sculpture.
  • Italian frescoes and American Sculpture. Beyond, in the small hall, are most interesting old Italian frescoes of the XVth and XVIth centuries. Then the Avery collection of Chinese cloisonnes is opposite the elevator. The chief works of interest in the sculpture art are in the American sculpture galleries 5.
  • Prints by European and American artists. Beyond this corridor is the Print Gallery, which was organized in 1914 and contains selections from an entire collection of between 3,000 and 4,000 prints by modern American and European artists.
  • Brooklyn Museum The Brooklyn Museum is situated at Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue, near the main entrance to Prospect Park, and may be reached from New York by subway. The collections are provided by the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences.
  • Arizona Indians The collection from the Arizona Indians in the Brooklyn Museum consists of implements for games, dance masks, weapons and basketry.
  • Buddhist Down this hall of the Brooklyn Museum are the Buddhist Collections.
  • Invertebrates Proceeding eastward, the Hall of Invertebrates of the Brooklyn Museum is next entered, where the sponges and corals, worms, mollusks, crustaceans and other types of animals lacking a backbone are exhibited.
  • Japan history An exhibit of ancient japanese objects is to be found in this hall of the Brooklyn Museum, including articles of all kinds representing Japanese life of the fourteenth, eighteenth or nineteenth centuries, and from centuries earlier also.
  • Japanese empire In four corridors surrounding the auditorium of the Brooklyn Museum is a representative collection of objects relating to the every-day life of the peoples of the Japanese Empire.
  • Mammals Returning to the Vertebrate Hall here at the Brooklyn Museum, the systematic series of mammals follows the exhibit, beginning with the large case containing the monotremes and marsupials. Examples of all living families of each are exhibited.
  • New Mexico Indians The remaining exhibits in Room 4 of the Brooklyn Museum are derived from the Hopi, Apache, Navajo and prehistoric cliff-dwelling Indians of New Mexico.
  • Vertebrates The Hall of Vertebrates of the Brooklyn Museum, leading out of Room 5 toward the west, contains exhibits of all the important groups of backboned animals from fish to man.
  • Zuni Indians The first of these halls of the Brooklyn Museum is devoted to exhibits illustrating the customs, arts and industries of the Indians of the Southwest, and of these the Zuni.
  • THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART.
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The metropolitan museum of art is a private corporation, founded in 1870 by a number of public-spirited citizens, and managed by a board of trustees. The Museum building was provided by the city. The Metropolitan is the largest and richest art museum in America; it is a vast storehouse of treasures in the several departments of the fine arts.
  • Classical Terracotas, Marbles and Oriental art. Before leaving the Museum turn to the right and pass through gallery 8 looking at some of the terra cotta figurines from Greece, Asia Minor, and Lower Italy. Go through the far door, turn to the left and in the south end of the main entrance hall are some important original Greek and Roman marbles.
  • Egyptian art, monuments and medieval armours. Entering the Museum we find ourselves in an impressive hall. At the right is the beginning of the series of rooms devoted to the Egyptian section. Then we pass to the Armour exhibition.
  • Greek and Roman Bronzes and Rodin Sculptures. The room of greek and roman bronzes by the left archway and we find ourselves facing a large marble group. Opposite this is a large plaster cast of "The Thinker," by the greatest French sculptor, Rodin.
  • Italian Renaissance Art Passing into gallery 38 we find furniture, rugs, sculpture, and other objects, chiefly of the Italian Renaissance, that is, of the XVth and XVIth centuries.
  • Musical Instruments and Decorative Arts. This remarkable collection consists of about 4,000 keyboards and instruments of all nations and includes the earliest known piano, that made by Cristofori in 1720.Passing thence through several galleries of casts° we come to the entrance of wing F, which is devoted to the decorative arts. Here, in a series of 25 galleries, we find Gothic and Renaissance furniture, sculpture, woodwork and tapestries. The XVIIIth century decorative arts, mainly French.
  • AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY.
  • American Museum of Natural History The American Museum of Natural History was founded for the purpose of establishing a Museum and Library of Natural History; of encouraging and developing the study of Natural Science; of advancing the general knowledge of kindred subjects, and to that end of furnishing popular instruction.
  • Africa This hall of the American Museum of Natural History, in the main, is given over to a systematic outline of Africa.
  • Ages of man Conspicuous in the center of this hall of the American Museum of Natural History is the Age of Man Hall.
  • Ancient mexico Here in this pavillion of the American Museum of Natural History is contained an exposition of the most ancient monuments of Mexico and Central America. The reproductions are chiefly from sculptures of Maya and Nahua Indians made before Columbus reached ancient Mexico.
  • Birds This hall of the American Museum of Natural History. Designed to illustrate not only the habits but also the haunts of the species represented, there are usually installed in each group adult bird or birds, nest, eggs and young.
  • Birds of the world. Beginning on the right, the first four cases contain representatives of the 13,000 known species of birds in the principal groups, arranged according to their natural relationships.
  • Blackfoot Indians. The Tower Room in this hall of the American Museum of Natural History is devoted to the collections from the Blackfoot Indians.
  • Chinese Collection The Chinese collection of the American Museum of Natural History illustrates the home industries and social life as they existed among the common people of China.
  • Dinosaurs In this hall of the American Museum of Natural History are skeletons of fossil dinosaurs that were the great terrestrial vertebrates of their day.
  • Extinct mammals. The skeletons in this and the adjoining halls are those of extinct mammals, most of which have been buried for so long that they have become petrified.
  • Fishes. This exhibit of the American Museum of Natural History is composed of typical examples of the various groups of vertebrates popularly comprised in the term "fishes."
  • Gems and precious stones. This splendid series of gems and precious stones in the American Museum of Natural History, together with the Bement collection of minerals in the adjoining hall, includes many large and rare forms of cut and uncut gems, some of which cannot be duplicated.
  • Geology and paleontology In the American Museum of Natural History, containing the mastodons and mammoths, is the Hall of Geology and Invertebrate Palaeontology.
  • Hopi Indians This section of this hall of the American Museum of Natural History contains artifacts and history from the Hopi Indians.
  • Indians of South America Included in this hall of the American Museum of Natural History are archaeological collections from the ancient peoples who lived along the western and north-western coasts of South America.
  • Indians of the northwest coast. Here in the south central wing of the American Museum of Natural History are displayed specimens illustrating the culture of the Indians of the Northwest Coast of America and also of the Eskimo.
  • Insects the section showing the importance of insects, also the benefits they render by pollination of many of our crops and flowers. Next are sections explaining the terms used in the classification of insects.
  • Invertebrates The specimens in this room of the American Museum of Natural History are chiefly Invertebrates. The installation in the Alcoves is designed to give a synopsis of the animal kingdom and the relationships between the various groups, while the special exhibits, are intended to illustrate certain biological principles.
  • Iroquois indians Most of the specimens shown in this hall of the American Museum of Natural History were collected from Indians who formerly lived or who now reside east of the Mississippi River and south of the Great Lakes, a large section being devoted to the Iroquois Indians.
  • Maidu indians The Maidu of the Sacramento Valley are represented by models of their houses, foods, medicines, clothing and utilitarian objects.
  • Mammals of North America As the visitor gets on the second floor of the American Museum of Natural History he faces the collection of mammals of North America.
  • Mammals of the world The exhibit is designed primarily as an introduction to the study of the orders and families of Mammals and to indicate the relationships of existing mammals to one another and their point of origin in the past.
  • Meteorites. Museum's collection of meteorites, popularly known as shooting stars. This meteorites ranging in weight from a few pounds to thirty-six tons.
  • Pacific Islands. Near the entrance of this hall of the American Museum of Natural History are the collections from the pacific islands.
  • Philippine Islands. Through the center of the philippine islands hall of the American Museum of Natural History will be found, a large collection of objects.
  • Plains Indians. These collections of the American Museum of Natural History have been secured from among those tribes of Indians living on the Plains and Prairies west of the Mississippi.
  • Public health. In a prominent position in the entrance way to the west corridor of the American Museum of Natural History is the exhibition of public health.
  • Reptiles and Amphibians At the present time this hall of the American Museum of Natural History contains a varied assemblage of animals, but in the main is devoted to a series of groups of reptiles and amphibians.
  • Seminole Indians The Seminole exhibit of the American Museum of Natural History is one of the three existing collections from these Indians. This tribe formerly occupied the greater part of Florida.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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