A guide to the New York art scene with descriptions of museums and galleries. The city art, culture, artist community in the New York City art.    
 
The City of New York is the most marvelous exemplification of those traits of the American people which have made the United States of to-day. Interest in New York does not lie in the mere magnitude of the city, but is found rather in the bound-less enterprise, the bold conception and the amazing achievement, which have reared the mighty fabric of the Metropolis. The theme is one which might well challenge the pen of him who would celebrate the America of the beginning of the Twentieth Century.
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NEW YORK CITY ART

  • A Guide to the Works of Art in New York. This "Guide to the Works of Art in New York City" has been compiled with data from art works in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, the Art Commission of the City, the Municipal Art Society, and the West 156th Street group of societies.
  • Metropolitan Museum of Art The metropolitan museum of art is a private corporation, founded in 1870 by a number of public-spirited citizens, and managed by a board of trustees. The Museum building was provided by the city. The Metropolitan is the largest and richest art museum in America; it is a vast storehouse of treasures in the several departments of the fine arts.
  • The Brooklyn Museum The Brooklyn Museum is situated at Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue, near the main entrance to Prospect Park, and may be reached from New York by subway. The collections are provided by the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences.
  • American paintings and artists. Entering the Brooklyn Museum take the elevator at the end of the corridor to the third floor, which is entirely devoted to art. On the walls of the landing are large photographs of Gothic cathedrals, of special interest are the collection of american paintings from american artists.
  • Egyptian Collection. Pottery, glass and porcelain. The Egyptian and prehistoric collection is in the wall case. The Tiffany glass is a representative exhibit. Beside this is Venetian glass of the XVIth, XVIIth, and XVIIIth centuries. There follow cases of pottery, and a collection of English glass. The Woodward collection of Greco-Roman glass is in gallery 8. Gallery 9 is filled with textiles and the wall cases with European porcelain.
  • European Gallery and Renaissance Sculptures. The Woodward collection of jade is installed in the room opening out of the Tissot gallery. It includes a comprehensive selection of various classes of objects including chinese jade, European paintings and Renaissance sculpture.
  • Italian frescoes and American Sculpture. Beyond, in the small hall, are most interesting old Italian frescoes of the XVth and XVIth centuries. Then the Avery collection of Chinese cloisonnes is opposite the elevator. The chief works of interest in the sculpture art are in the American sculpture galleries 5.
  • Prints by European and American artists. Beyond this corridor is the Print Gallery, which was organized in 1914 and contains selections from an entire collection of between 3,000 and 4,000 prints by modern American and European artists.
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The metropolitan museum of art is a private corporation, founded in 1870 by a number of public-spirited citizens, and managed by a board of trustees. The Museum building was provided by the city. The Metropolitan is the largest and richest art museum in America; it is a vast storehouse of treasures in the several departments of the fine arts.
  • Classical Terracotas, Marbles and Oriental art. Before leaving the Museum turn to the right and pass through gallery 8 looking at some of the terra cotta figurines from Greece, Asia Minor, and Lower Italy. Go through the far door, turn to the left and in the south end of the main entrance hall are some important original Greek and Roman marbles.
  • Egyptian art, monuments and medieval armours. Entering the Museum we find ourselves in an impressive hall. At the right is the beginning of the series of rooms devoted to the Egyptian section. Then we pass to the Armour exhibition.
  • Greek and Roman Bronzes and Rodin Sculptures. The room of greek and roman bronzes by the left archway and we find ourselves facing a large marble group. Opposite this is a large plaster cast of "The Thinker," by the greatest French sculptor, Rodin.
  • Italian Renaissance Art Passing into gallery 38 we find furniture, rugs, sculpture, and other objects, chiefly of the Italian Renaissance, that is, of the XVth and XVIth centuries.
  • Musical Instruments and Decorative Arts. This remarkable collection consists of about 4,000 keyboards and instruments of all nations and includes the earliest known piano, that made by Cristofori in 1720.Passing thence through several galleries of casts° we come to the entrance of wing F, which is devoted to the decorative arts. Here, in a series of 25 galleries, we find Gothic and Renaissance furniture, sculpture, woodwork and tapestries. The XVIIIth century decorative arts, mainly French.

 


 

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